Aliases of Sugar: How Many Names Does Sugar Have?

Most criminals don’t have 56 or more aliases yet sugar does. The real life mobsters featured in Hollywood’s The Irishman didn’t have many aliases. Let’s see Russel Bufalino was also known as McGee and the Old Man. Then there was Frank Sheeran known at the Irishman. Jimmy Hoffa has no alias listed. While it might be a stretch but sugar and how it is sneaking into our food should be considered as crime.

Added sugar is hiding in 74% of packaged foods

SugarScience UCSF

Prepared snacks and foods no longer have simple ingredient lists. It’s full of ingredients that I have never seen on the grocery store shelf. How does one grow dimethyl dicarbonate, calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, or butylated hydroxytoluene? Or maybe the more basic question should be of how do you pronounce these ingredients? Don’t even get me started on the “natural flavors” ingredient. Ooops. Well that can of worms just got opened! According to a New York Times article “Government regulations define natural flavors as those that derive their aroma or flavor chemicals from plant or animal sources, including fruit, meat, fish, spices, herbs, roots, leaves, buds or bark that are distilled, fermented or otherwise manipulated in a lab.”

Companies are confusing consumers into thinking their products are “natural”, “healthy”, and “good for you” every single day. Food companies are no better than consumer goods companies that engage in greenwashing. Cambridge Dictionary says greenwashing is designed “to make people believe that your company is doing more to protect the environment than it really is.”

Companies that have engaged in greenwashing on a wide scale have made headlines over the years. In the mid-1980s, for example, oil company Chevron commissioned a series of expensive television and print ads to broadcast its environmental dedication. But while the now-infamous “The People Do” campaign ran, Chevron was actively violating the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act, as well as spilling oil into wildlife refuges.

Adryan Corcione

Between greenwashing and sugar being snuck into our foods under one of 56 aliases, is anyone else angry? I’m angry! What happens when I get angry? I VOTE WITH MY DOLLARS! I refuse to purchase foods with ingredients that I cannot pronounce or grow in our garden. With 15 food allergies, I have no problem avoiding these foods. However I do recognize that time may not always be on your side to make all of your meals fresh each day. I meal prep once a week in order to achieve the goal of eating healthy on a budget while balancing limited time.

In case you were wondering, here are all of sugar’s known aliases:

white ceramic mugs on white table
  1. Agave Nectar/Syrup
  2. Barley malt
  3. Beet sugar
  4. Blackstrap molasses
  5. Brown rice syrup
  6. Brown sugar
  7. Buttered sugar/buttercream
  8. Cane juice crystals
  9. Cane sugar
  10. Caramel
  11. Carob syrup
  12. Castor sugar
  13. Coconut sugar
  14. Confectioner’s sugar (aka, powdered sugar)
  15. Corn syrup
  16. Corn syrup solids
  17. Crystalline fructose
  18. Date sugar
  19. Demerara sugar
  20. Dextrin
  21. Dextrose
  22. Diastatic malt
  23. Ethyl maltol
  24. Evaporated cane juice
  25. Florida crystals
  26. Fructose
  27. Fruit juice
  28. Fruit juice concentrate
  29. Galactose
  30. Glucose
  31. Glucose syrup solids
  32. Golden sugar
  33. Golden syrup
  34. Grape sugar
  35. High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
  36. Honey
  37. Icing sugar
  38. Invert sugar
  39. Lactose
  40. Malt syrup
  41. Maltodextrin
  42. Maltose
  43. Maple syrup
  44. Molasses
  45. Muscovado sugar
  46. Panela sugar
  47. Raw sugar
  48. Refiner’s syrup
  49. Rice syrup
  50. Sorghum syrup
  51. Sucanat
  52. Sucrose
  53. Sugar (granulated or table)
  54. Treacle
  55. Turbinado sugar
  56. Yellow sugar

Eating Great Food on a Budget: Part 1

Eating Great Food on a Budget: Part 2: Chicken

Eating Great Food on a Budget: Part 3 Pasta

Eating Great Food on a Budget: Part 4 Veggies/Sides

Advertisements

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s